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How To Write a Military to civilian resume, Some Important Tips You Should Follow

how to write military resume to civilian

During the transition from the military to the civilian economy, a veteran will develop a military résumé. Vets may showcase their unique military experience, education, and skills in their resumes. The talents you have that are relevant to the positions you are applying for can be highlighted, just as they would be on a conventional resume. Your Veteran CV should demonstrate your commitment to your work and how you can use the abilities you learned in the Veteran in a civilian setting.

Writing a Veteran CV often involves explaining your transferrable abilities in a way that a civilian can grasp. As a result, you should utilize straightforward English on your resume, even if you are used to utilizing military jargon. The use of proper terminology is crucial when producing an appealing Veteran  CV for a civilian employment. In this post, we’ll show you how to construct a civilian CV that includes military experience.

How to write a military to civilian resume

To help you write this sort of CV, here are some tips:

1. Add summary statement.

Include a brief overview of your talents and accomplishments at the top of your resume. Your talents, achievements or past job experience might be highlighted in this section. Recruiters will be looking for a statement that demonstrates your qualifications for the role and attracts their attention. Here are some examples.

2. When listing job experience, use the reverse chronological sequence.

Even while prior work experience is important, the recruiter is most interested in your current work experience. The recruiter will be able to view your most relevant skills first and foremost if you have your most recent military experience available. Your cover letter is likely to have provided a decent overview of your experience, but they’ll still want to know more about it before moving forward.

3. Add skills section.

According to what was said earlier, you want to state your talents in civilian language. If they are relevant to the employment, you can also include the abilities you had prior to serving in the military. A team of recruiters, for example, may have been under your management. Some of these abilities include team leadership and time management. There are numerous different sorts of jobs that you might fill using the abilities you’ve developed so far.

4. Give a brief description of your schooling.

Never neglect to include your education on a resume. Indicate whether you attended any additional courses or seminars throughout your. You should also include a list of certificates on your resume if you have any. As part of the education portion of the website, they can also be listed separately under certificates and licenses.

5. List the duties you performed throughout your military service.

You should highlight in your resume the accomplishments that are relevant to the professional route you’ve selected after leaving the military. For instance:

  • As a result of a promotion to the rank of battalion commander in the Army, you have earned management experience. A career in human resources would benefit greatly from this skill set.
  • This implies that you have some experience operating specialized electronic devices and understanding about computers, which may be readily transferred to positions in information technology.

how to write a Veteran resume to civilian

6. Include relevant awards and security clearances.

Try to add security clearances in your “professional experience” section wherever applicable. Do not be precise while mentioning your security clearance, though. In the case of top-secret clearance in the military, for example, you can just declare that fact without detailing what you did with it. It is remarkable to hiring managers that you have a security clearance, since it demonstrates that you have through a thorough background check and can be trusted with sensitive information.

7. Use the job description’s keywords.

Make a note of the keywords you notice in the job descriptions while you construct your CV. Those keywords should be included in your resume since the recruiting manager is especially looking for them. You can also utilize more civilian terminology in your paper as a result of this.

8. Translate any veteran jargon into civilian terms.

While you may be conversant with military acronyms, codes, and jargon, a civilian recruiter may only be aware of a handful of them. As a result, as many non-military terms as feasible should be included in your veteran CV. Once you’ve highlighted the important parts of your veteran service in your resume, look for any references to military terminology and replace them with simple English.

In order to translate military jargon and codes into easy language for your veteran CV, you may refer to the following examples:

  •         Rather than stating that you “commanded” other individuals, state that you “supervised” or “directed” a group of people to reach a common goal.
  •         Performance appraisal” is a better alternative to “Open Educational Resources.”
  •         Substitute “relocation” for all instances of “PSC.”
  •         Rather than referring to a battalion, use the term “organization.”
  •         Use terms like “conflict” and “dangerous circumstances” to describe fighting.
  •         Use the terms “employees,” “colleagues,” or “coworkers” to refer to your “subordinates.”

9. Double- and triple-check the mechanics of your resume.

Your resume should be reviewed before it is sent, just as you wouldn’t go into war without double-checking the operation of your weapon, your ammo supply, the amount of gasoline in your vehicle, or the number of troops in the squad.

Simple mechanics like format, spelling, dates, and overall accuracy should be thoroughly checked on your veteran resume.

Important Resume Sections for Military Veterans

A veteran’s most important resume part is the “Key Skills” section, which should be based on a functional, skills-based resume style. Immediately following the resume summary, this part should include the bulk of the resume’s material.

If you are looking for a position that requires a certain set of abilities, provide a description of those skills in the skills section of your resume. But you may also include a section called “Additional Talents” that gives a list of your skills without going into detail about each one.

According to the profession they are looking for, veterans often have a record of accomplishments, credentials, and courses they’ve taken. Use a resume builder to create sections for each of these characteristics on your resume.

How to Build a Military Veteran Resume

Despite the fact that you can find dozens of military veteran resume examples online, just printing off a generic resume and adding personal information isn’t going to get you far. As a result, the majority of military resumes are written in a very technical style. For a civilian position, you’ll need to utilize a different language and even a different structure to catch the eye of hiring managers.

Veteran resume template

Personal detail

  • Name
  • Number
  • Address
  • Email- ID

Profile

XYZ is looking for a narcotics investigation job for a Marine Corps Military Police Officer. A pending BA in criminal justice (currently in last semester); substantial field training; and considerable experience in safety patrol, security details, undercover investigations, and public-service activities are among the qualifications. Crime scene management and counter-terrorism simulation expertise.

Experience

XYZ — Current Assignment: XYZ / Previous Deployment: Iraq Military Police Officer, XYZ Awarded MP position after completing XX weeks of basic training and another XX weeks of rigorous, specialised MP training. Currently working as a Military Police officer at Camp Pendleton USMC Post, safeguarding lives and property, patrolling the military base, and maintaining law and order. Previously, while an overseas tour in Iraq, I supported tactical operations and provided area/convoy security (Operation Iraqi Freedom).

Key Skills

  • Law Enforcement & Public Safety
  • Emergency Planning & Response
  • Security/Surveillance Operations
  • Criminal Investigations
  • Crime Prevention
  • Traffic Patrol
  • Evidence Collection
  • Interviews & Interrogations
  • Crime Scene Management
  • Self sufficiency
  • Effective Communications
  • Problem Solving

Education

SOMETOWN HIGH SCHOOL — Sometown, MI High School Diploma, 6/04 XYZ University — Sometown, CA BA in Criminal Justice Candidate — Degree Expected: 12/09 / Current GPA: 3.7

Recognition and Awards

  • Three USMC Commendation Medals for heroic/life-saving acts of courage (2005/2007), the Good Conduct Medal (2009), and the Combat Action Badge have been bestowed to him (2007).
  • Earned Expert Marksman Awards in both small arms and assault weapons.
  • In the MP class, with honors in marksmanship, UCMJ mastery, patrol procedures, and physical conditioning.

Additional Skills

  • Spoken languages: Arabic, Japanese, Spanish
  • Software skills: Microsoft Office Suite and Adobe Acrobat

With decades of expertise creating military service members’ resumes, the Writrox team can help. As a result of your service to your nation, you are entitled to a successful career. Poorly written veteran resume examples won’t help you stand out from the crowd. Interested in a free consultation?

Contact Best Resume writing services in usa now! If you ask for a veteran resume sample, you won’t get one. We’ll evaluate your information and clarify what you need to include in order to qualify for the positions you’re interested in pursuing.

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